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College & Career Tips

Here is a page dedicated to sharing tips and tricks, for those who are interested in attending college or getting a career in their future.

Ms. Scully's email - tuc52250@temple.edu

Writing Tips

Fused/Run-on Sentences

  • A fused/run-on sentence occurs when two or more independent clauses are joined without any punctuation or connecting word between them.
  • These should not be used in any form of writing because readers need breaks in-between ideas.
  • Ex: I was getting ready to study for my test when all of a sudden my mom called me to eat dinner, then I was eating dinner and needed a drink, and I went to the fridge to get a Gatorade, and then I finished my dinner, and after I was done I wanted dessert but remembered I had to study for my test, so I went back upstairs to study.

Transitions

  • Good transitions can connect paragraphs and turn disconnected writing into a unified whole. Instead of treating paragraphs as separate ideas, transitions can help readers understand how paragraphs work together, reference one another, and build to a larger point. The key to producing good transitions is highlighting connections between corresponding paragraphs. By referencing in one paragraph the relevant material from previous paragraphs; writers can develop important points for their readers.
  • Ex: Firstly, Second, Lastly, In conclusion, To begin, Finally, Additionally, etc.

Homophones

  • Words that sound alike but have different spellings and meanings. As a result, these words are often misused.
  • Your writing needs to be looked over and reviewed to avoid any misuse of homophones. If a reader is looking at your writing and sees that you misused “their, there and they’re,” they will assume that you do not know the difference and you will come off incompetent.

 

Examples:

  •      Accept (to receive): "I accept your apology."
  •      Except (excluded from): "I like everyone except her."
  •      Principal (head of a school): "The principal is your pal."
  •      Principle (a moral or fundamental truth): "That is against my principles."
  •      There (meaning "in that place"): "The book is over there."
  •      Their (possessive pronoun "belonging to them"): "Their book"
  •      They're (contraction for "they are"): "They're coming soon."
  •      Its (possessive pronoun): "The dog lost its bone."
  •      It's (contraction for "it is"): "It's a shame you can't come."

 

Contractions

  • Those formed by replacing missing letter(s) with an apostrophe. These contractions are formed either by shortening a word or merging two words into one.
  • These should NEVER be used in any form of professional writing (high school or college essays/papers, resumes or cover letters). The use of contractions sends the message that you are lazy and looking for shortcuts in your work.

 

Contraction

Original

aren't

are not

can't

cannot

couldn't

could not

didn't

did not

doesn't

does not

don't

do not

hadn't

had not

hasn't

has not

haven't

have not

he'd

he had, he would

he'll

he will, he shall

he's

he is, he has

I'd

I had, I would

I'll

I will, I shall

I'm

I am

I've

I have

isn't

is not

it's

it is, it has

let's

let us

mustn't

must not

shan't

shall not

she'd

she had, she would

she'll

she will, she shall

she's

she is, she has

shouldn't

should not

that's

that is, that has

there's

there is, there has

they'd

they had, they would

they'll

they will, they shall

they're

they are

they've

they have

we'd

we had, we would

we're

we are

we've

we have

weren't

were not

what'll

what will, what shall

what're

what are

what's

what is, what has

what've

what have

where's

where is, where has

who'd

who had, who would

who'll

who will, who shall

who're

who are

who's

who is, who has

who've

who have

won't

will not

wouldn't

would not

you'd

you had, you would

you'll

you will, you shall

you're

you are

you've

you have

 

Related Links

Federal Student Aid

https://fafsa.ed.gov/

SAT Registrations

https://www.collegeboard.org/

Federal Student Loans

https://studentloans.gov/myDirectLoan/index.action

Federal Work-Study Programs

http://www2.ed.gov/programs/fws/index.html

What Should Your Major Be?

https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/explore-careers

Find Your College

https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/find-colleges/how-find-your-college-fit

College Costs

http://collegecost.ed.gov/

Government Grants

http://www.usa.gov/Citizen/Topics/Benefits.shtml

Grants

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/home.html

Scholarships

https://www.salliemae.com/plan-for-college/scholarships/

Study Tips

http://www.howtostudy.org/

Study Tips

http://www.campusexplorer.com/college-advice-tips/2DF9E34D/7-Best-Study-Tips-for-College-Students/

Resumes & Cover Letters

http://www.temple.edu/provost/careercenter/students/resume-and-cover-letter.html

LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/

Writing Resources

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/

Citations Generator for Bibliographies

http://www.easybib.com/

Bibliography Creator

https://www.refworks.com/refworks2/default.aspx?r=authentication::init

  Phone- 215-949-1700     Fax- 215-949-2104